Posts Tagged Esmée

6 weeks of hard work

Another big task for this week is reflecting on all the learnings for so far. Because everyone experienced these weeks differently I asked the following questions to everyone in the InterHague team:

  • What did you learn the most from all of the past weeks reflections?
  • Which team blog has had the most impact or has been the most useful to you?

Esmée:

I learned a lot about communication, in the beginning I thought I wouldn’t be that good in team work, but after all the (preparations of the) reflections I saw that we all worked together so well! In the beginning we all had some trouble but we came back on track and improved the result of our work so much! I’m proud of our team and proud of the process of changing confusiasm into enthusiasm! The team blog that had the most impact on me was the one of IDE Collaborators. We also had a hangout with them because they could really help us with advices based on organizing a NGO better. They used google a lot and gave us some insights in those tools. As a tech steward that is very interesting. It will bring people together at the right places and right times. Everything will go a lot smoother so time can be used better and nothing goes to waste.

Alisa:

It’s been one month into our project, but it feels like it’s been ages! (In a good way though) This project has been a rollercoaster in terms of defining challenges for our NGO and at the same time dealing with the challenges within our group. I am Client Service of my team, and throughout these weeks my main focus was to establish good communication between the NGO and our team. For myself I discovered several aspects of teamwork which previously I wouldn’t even take into consideration. One important revelation that I will definitely bring into my future work – it is important to establish strong relationship with your client not only on behalf of your group, but make sure that your group feels the connection with the client. In terms of our blog – I’ve mostly learned not from our reflections, but from the process of preparing our reflections. It was usually group work – we’ve always discussed key points together, and I think that allowed all of us stay on a similar track and define the important tasks within a group. In short, I think that reflection posts served more as checkpoints for our team and kept our work more or less correlated with the project manual. I think that week we posted infographic on Stahili Foundation needs was the one when we came up with strategy and direction of our team work.

Other blogs – for me, the most relevant and inspirational one was IDE Collaborators blog. I’ve been following their blog from the start. In our first two weeks into our projects I read all blog posts of all teams, and they were the ones I found to be the most serious and enthusiastic about the project. Also, what caught my eye was the language they used (pretty formal and elaborate, but with a pitch of humor), and their visual representation – they use a lot of informative pictures or gifs in their posts, so before you start reading the post, you already have an idea what it’s about. Other thing that I really like about their blog – they are not afraid to write long posts, explaining their progress and why they do things the way they do. For me, I see that I can start reading their blog from any week and get the idea of what their project is about and where they are at a given point (in terms of group work AND their progress with their NGO).

Anton:

Each reflection post is a great idea to summarise our approaches and struggles we had during all past weeks. I liked and really appreciate the thing that my team really helped me a lot to prepare my own reflection post. It was really easier to reflect everything using our infographics (thanks to Manda) that showed clearly what was going on whole week. And analysing our reflections I am really happy that each week we had less struggles inside our team and group and more certain steps. Personally for me it was nice to compare also Watotomages blog to see their approaches so far. And as a good example of good blog I would mention “The ducks” and “IDE Collaborators”

Edvinas:

Since I had a lot of problems with my health I couldn’t participate in our project as i wanted and reading the reflections in the blogs  was the biggest help for me from my teammates and other teams because i could follow everything based on our NGO and NGO’s that other teams are cooperating with. So basically after a long weeks of being ill, I stood back on my legs and with a help of my team and tutor I got from confusiastic to ethusiastic. I really appreciate the fact that my team didn’t turn off and were full of ideas how should i get back and join the Project. So right now I’m doing my best to solve this big puzzle and will do everything to make the final video look great! And about the blog, since the first day, I really liked the “ IDE Collaborators” writing style, with a clearly and correctly written blogs, they still got a daring to add some humor into it. And i loved it.

Manda:

When thinking about what I learned so far, the first thing coming to my mind is – blogging. I already knew there were “these blogs” on the internet and I even know some (really successful) bloggers personally as well, but nevertheless it was a revelation to me, what it is really all about. As part of Project Community I understand the entire function of a blog and how it works. I dealt with all the details like the writing style, the content, the structure and visualization. And I have to admit that it’s really amazing to me – I even think about writing a personal blog (and all my friends and former work mates want me to do this ;)). The second thing is not really a learning but a pleasant experience. As described in our blog we worked very well on giving feedback and reflect on our work and on ourselves. I was used to work together with people to whom giving feedback and reflection was normal, in my Scout Organization as well as at IKEA it was a daily faire. Hence I was surprised in a positive way that it worked so well with a group of five people from five different countries, knowing each other hardly two weeks at the beginning. I think this matter contributes a lot to our team work and especially to our very fast developing team spirit.  Having a look at other teams and their blogs, there are two teams which are outstanding to me: IDE Collaborators and Split United. Both teams convinced me through their enthusiasm and their energy, it seems that you can really feel it through their blogs. I enjoy reading them because the posts are well structured but more important they are visually attractive. I like that they work with useful graphics (for example the post about “Twitch” from Split United) and that the main points are really outstanding, so you get the most important facts very easy and fast (for example “We want to rally […]” from IDE Collaborators). In my opinion the latter is the most important considering the flood of information from all the blogs 😉

giphy

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Posted in Blogs, InterHague, NGO Groups, Stahili Foundation, Students, Teams
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: InterHague

6 weeks of hard work

Another big task for this week is reflecting on all the learnings for so far. Because everyone experienced these weeks differently I asked the following questions to everyone in the InterHague team:

  • What did you learn the most from all of the past weeks reflections?
  • Which team blog has had the most impact or has been the most useful to you?

Esmée:

I learned a lot about communication, in the beginning I thought I wouldn’t be that good in team work, but after all the (preparations of the) reflections I saw that we all worked together so well! In the beginning we all had some trouble but we came back on track and improved the result of our work so much! I’m proud of our team and proud of the process of changing confusiasm into enthusiasm! The team blog that had the most impact on me was the one of IDE Collaborators. We also had a hangout with them because they could really help us with advices based on organizing a NGO better. They used google a lot and gave us some insights in those tools. As a tech steward that is very interesting. It will bring people together at the right places and right times. Everything will go a lot smoother so time can be used better and nothing goes to waste.

Alisa:

It’s been one month into our project, but it feels like it’s been ages! (In a good way though) This project has been a rollercoaster in terms of defining challenges for our NGO and at the same time dealing with the challenges within our group. I am Client Service of my team, and throughout these weeks my main focus was to establish good communication between the NGO and our team. For myself I discovered several aspects of teamwork which previously I wouldn’t even take into consideration. One important revelation that I will definitely bring into my future work – it is important to establish strong relationship with your client not only on behalf of your group, but make sure that your group feels the connection with the client. In terms of our blog – I’ve mostly learned not from our reflections, but from the process of preparing our reflections. It was usually group work – we’ve always discussed key points together, and I think that allowed all of us stay on a similar track and define the important tasks within a group. In short, I think that reflection posts served more as checkpoints for our team and kept our work more or less correlated with the project manual. I think that week we posted infographic on Stahili Foundation needs was the one when we came up with strategy and direction of our team work.

Other blogs – for me, the most relevant and inspirational one was IDE Collaborators blog. I’ve been following their blog from the start. In our first two weeks into our projects I read all blog posts of all teams, and they were the ones I found to be the most serious and enthusiastic about the project. Also, what caught my eye was the language they used (pretty formal and elaborate, but with a pitch of humor), and their visual representation – they use a lot of informative pictures or gifs in their posts, so before you start reading the post, you already have an idea what it’s about. Other thing that I really like about their blog – they are not afraid to write long posts, explaining their progress and why they do things the way they do. For me, I see that I can start reading their blog from any week and get the idea of what their project is about and where they are at a given point (in terms of group work AND their progress with their NGO).

Anton:

Each reflection post is a great idea to summarise our approaches and struggles we had during all past weeks. I liked and really appreciate the thing that my team really helped me a lot to prepare my own reflection post. It was really easier to reflect everything using our infographics (thanks to Manda) that showed clearly what was going on whole week. And analysing our reflections I am really happy that each week we had less struggles inside our team and group and more certain steps. Personally for me it was nice to compare also Watotomages blog to see their approaches so far. And as a good example of good blog I would mention “The ducks” and “IDE Collaborators”

Edvinas:

Since I had a lot of problems with my health I couldn’t participate in our project as i wanted and reading the reflections in the blogs  was the biggest help for me from my teammates and other teams because i could follow everything based on our NGO and NGO’s that other teams are cooperating with. So basically after a long weeks of being ill, I stood back on my legs and with a help of my team and tutor I got from confusiastic to ethusiastic. I really appreciate the fact that my team didn’t turn off and were full of ideas how should i get back and join the Project. So right now I’m doing my best to solve this big puzzle and will do everything to make the final video look great! And about the blog, since the first day, I really liked the “ IDE Collaborators” writing style, with a clearly and correctly written blogs, they still got a daring to add some humor into it. And i loved it.

Manda:

When thinking about what I learned so far, the first thing coming to my mind is – blogging. I already knew there were “these blogs” on the internet and I even know some (really successful) bloggers personally as well, but nevertheless it was a revelation to me, what it is really all about. As part of Project Community I understand the entire function of a blog and how it works. I dealt with all the details like the writing style, the content, the structure and visualization. And I have to admit that it’s really amazing to me – I even think about writing a personal blog (and all my friends and former work mates want me to do this ;)). The second thing is not really a learning but a pleasant experience. As described in our blog we worked very well on giving feedback and reflect on our work and on ourselves. I was used to work together with people to whom giving feedback and reflection was normal, in my Scout Organization as well as at IKEA it was a daily faire. Hence I was surprised in a positive way that it worked so well with a group of five people from five different countries, knowing each other hardly two weeks at the beginning. I think this matter contributes a lot to our team work and especially to our very fast developing team spirit.  Having a look at other teams and their blogs, there are two teams which are outstanding to me: IDE Collaborators and Split United. Both teams convinced me through their enthusiasm and their energy, it seems that you can really feel it through their blogs. I enjoy reading them because the posts are well structured but more important they are visually attractive. I like that they work with useful graphics (for example the post about “Twitch” from Split United) and that the main points are really outstanding, so you get the most important facts very easy and fast (for example “We want to rally […]” from IDE Collaborators). In my opinion the latter is the most important considering the flood of information from all the blogs 😉

giphy

Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,
Posted in Blogs, InterHague, NGO Groups, Stahili Foundation, Students, Teams
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: InterHague

First video teamwork

For the end of this project we will make a video about all the solution we gathered for our NGO. To make this video we need video tools, I’ve made a list of all the video tools available in both teams.Video

The video tool list contains:
Manda: IPad, iPhone, GoPro, reflex camera
Emilio: Phone
Mate: Camera (canon)
Anton: Camera (canon), GoPro
Georg: Camera (lumix)
Sandra: Video camera (canon)
Esmée: iPhone, digital camera

We also have Edvinas who is very good at video editing and has some video programs on his laptop, someone from the other team will help him to edit the video in the end.

We will start the first filming session next Wednesday, during the stahili event in the Hague.

I’ve got faith in our teamwork and can see the video coming alive, do you too?

Tagged with: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Blogs, InterHague, NGO Groups, Stahili Foundation, Students, Teams
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: InterHague

First video teamwork

For the end of this project we will make a video about all the solution we gathered for our NGO. To make this video we need video tools, I’ve made a list of all the video tools available in both teams.Video

The video tool list contains:
Manda: IPad, iPhone, GoPro, reflex camera
Emilio: Phone
Mate: Camera (canon)
Anton: Camera (canon), GoPro
Georg: Camera (lumix)
Sandra: Video camera (canon)
Esmée: iPhone, digital camera

We also have Edvinas who is very good at video editing and has some video programs on his laptop, someone from the other team will help him to edit the video in the end.

We will start the first filming session next Wednesday, during the stahili event in the Hague.

I’ve got faith in our teamwork and can see the video coming alive, do you too?

Tagged with: , , , , , , ,
Posted in Blogs, InterHague, NGO Groups, Stahili Foundation, Students, Teams
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: InterHague

R E F L E C T I O N

  HI PEOPLE!
Last week we had some struggles organising efficient work within our group – figuring out each others roles and responsibilities and what input each of us may  bring into our group in general. My team wasn’t really satisfied of my work, but starting from this week I took the whole managing system of our group in my hands. This week we were successful at resolving those issues, and as a team leader, I see that our work has become a lot better.

Last week we all did our own part and that was it, we did what the course guide told us but none of us didn’t really know what the others were doing. We talked about that at Monday and we solved a lot of issues in our group. This made us more open and now everyone can share their ideas and opinions. We work together and we know what everyone expects from each other. We can share our work when we’re overloaded and we are open for extra work. Now our team works with quite straight and understandable system with blog, social media and certain meetings.

TEAM Sweet Spot

Sweet spot due to NGO challenges
Sweet spot due to NGO challenges

After productive Personal Branding class we compared our own Sweet spot diagrams and we wrote down all the things that we share like common gifts, passions and purposes. So using passion of crafting and being active, gifts of communicating, organising structure and patience and purposes against humiliation and exploitation of people and against nature distraction we build our own Team Sweet Spot.The idea of it in creating a better life for disadvantaged people through innovative ideas, leadership and training.
Also we had a very useful chat with Stahily representer here in the Hague Michelle Oliel. She explained which kinds of volunteers they need here in Europe and which one they need in Kenya, how does financial part of organisation works and where the possible sources of fundraising. She also told us that They need help in web designers, people who maintain website and people for spreading information through the papers or social networks.
So the impression after this week is really good. We finally start to loose our ‘confusiasm’ and clearly understand what we have to do. Also close team work and lots of new skills!
IMG_6430
Thanks for this week, waiting for new tasks in week 4!
Have a productive next week!

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Posted in Blogs, InterHague, NGO Groups, Stahili Foundation, Students, Teams
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: InterHague

First week as the ‘youngest’

As a 17 year old and just graduated high school kid, I knew I would be one of the youngest students  at the first day of school. After searIphone 9 september 2486ching for the gym for a while in a big new school I finally arrived at a crowded place, I saw new faces, many faces, international faces. We received a card that said we had to meet as many people as possible in 15 minutes. That’s what brought me in contact with the others. I heard so many great travelling stories and stories about what people already achieved in their lives. Some of the stories really inspired me and made me realize how different but also how connected we all are. There were so many cultures and backgrounds but we were all in the same place, with one main purpose, studying Industrial Design Engineering. And as I expected, there was just one other girl of 17 in that big hall, most of the other students were travellers, they did a gap year, maybe two, some even three years. At least I wasn’t the only one new in the student life. During the first few days we got assignments that showed us what the course expected from us and what we could expect from them. And I expect some great stuff now!

I met some Dutch girls the first day and during the week and the barbeque I got in touch with so many other great people! The sunset after the barbeque in Scheveningen was really pretty on a windy (dutch whether) day. And after the first week I was sure: these 3 years will be an extraordinary experience for me.

Esmée (or just S) Iphone 9 september 2491

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Posted in Blogs, InterHague, NGO Groups, Stahili Foundation, Students, Teams
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: InterHague

InterHague, IDE, NGO, Stahili – what?

Yes, that’s a really good question! It sounds very difficult but actually it is easier than you think :) So, let me explain!

Well, we are team InterHague: Alisa from Latvia, Edvinas from Lithuania, Anton from Ukraine, Esmée from The Netherlands and finally me, Manda from Germany. As you can see we are coming from all over you Europe, an international mix, gathered here in this beautiful city of The Hague. And what brought us together here? That is actually the common eager wish to become great industrial designers one day! And our dream starts here and now in participating in Industrial Design Engineering (IDE). So, let’s get started right away!

In our first project we have the honor to work together with a NGO (nongovernmental organization), namely the Stahili Foundation. Again, this weird word “Stahili” you may think now. But there’s a little hint in the word, maybe you can get it? Probably, if you speak Swahili, but I don’t think so 😉 So the word “Stahili” is the Swahili word for “deserve” and here’s the connection: Stahili Foundation is a volunteer-driven-non-profit organization that rescues and supports child victims of forced labour, exploitation, abuse and neglect in rural Kenya. It was founded by Laura Walker, Hannah Ackerman, and Michelle Oliel and they are fighting for the rights and the life children deserve. At the moment they take care about 30 orphans, but there are still a lot more children who have to be rescued! So let’s do it, let’s go to Kenya!

Well, that would be a little bit too far away 😉 But there are other opportunities for us to support the Stahili Foundation. First, we want to give them advice on fundraising through different channels. Furthermore, we want to help them to acquire much more volunteers to support them. And finally, we have the chance to revise their publicity material and messaging. So, a lot of work but we are quite enthusiastic and motivated about making a great effort and get to do something amazing!

Actually, we had our first contact with the Stahili Foundation and we are looking forward to getting to know Michelle Oriel, one of the founders of the foundation! We are really excited and can’t wait to tell you about it in our blog!
Stahili Foundation

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Posted in Blogs, InterHague, NGO Groups, Stahili Foundation, Students, Teams
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: InterHague

Meet a perfectionista

Hi everyone,Esmée Messemaker

I’m Esmée Messemaker, 17 years old, from the Netherlands and at the start line of an amazing lifetime.

And why is that so? Well I just started the course Industrial Design Engineering and I am very confusiastic about everything we’re going to learn.

During my years on high school in the Netherlands I was a shorttrack speed skater. I trained 8 times a week and skated a lot of competitions, last March I skated my last competition which was the European Championships. But for the upcoming years my focus will be on the University so speed skating will have to slip away for a while.

I’m ready for all the new challenges ahead and want to work with full power and excitement. As a perfectionist I always want to finish the assignments I started. I work precise and organized and want to get all out of the project. Although I still have to learn a lot. It’s important to accept the feedback I get and work with it. By doing so I will be able to expand my knowledge and make my projects even more successful.

English course as a Dutchie

Expanding my knowledge is also one of the main reasons why I choose the international course and not the Dutch program. During the IDE courses I’ll learn to corporate with international people, I’ll know more about different cultures and it will be easier to communicate and work with clients from abroad later in life. I’m also not afraid to take on challenges which made the decision for the English program even easier.

I hope to meet many kind and inspirational people during my years on the Hague University of Applied Science and I’m looking forward to all the new exciting projects.

Bring it on!

Esmée

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Posted in Blogs, InterHague, NGO Groups, Stahili Foundation, Students, Teams
This post was originally published at the Project Community blog: InterHague
Team Blogs
  1. 5 Kings 5kingsblog.wordpress.com
  2. BATCO batcoiwf.wordpress.com
  3. Blue Mood lijinghz2014.wordpress.com
  4. IDE Collaborators idecollaborators.wordpress.com
  5. IDE RESEARCHERS ideresearchers.wordpress.com
  6. InterHague interhague.wordpress.com
  7. ROBOBLOG blogwithswag.wordpress.com
  8. The Ducks projcomtheducks.wordpress.com
  9. Tiny Houses Found In Transition foundintransitionblog.wordpress.com
  10. Tiny Innovators tinyinnovators.wordpress.com
  11. watotomages watotomages.wordpress.com

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